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in the region, the regional leaders, people inside syria who are calling for more u.s. involvement and activity. there's an expectation that after the election the obama administration would take the wondering- we're all and waiting to see what is going to be. >> thanks to both of you for your questions. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> if you work for them, you get a mercurial, sometimes j generous, almost cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. men of his age and class are not going to apologize to a young secretary our typist. he had a way of turning the tables. his version of apology would be to say, i am a kind man and you're doing a good job today. the issue is never settled. he always had to get the last word in. one night going through white hall, a german bomb fell nearby. his bodyguard pushed him into a doorway. a couple of thompson's men were slightly wounded. churchill did not like to be touched. he said, thompson, do not do that. tonight, and extended 90 minute q&a with paul reid. "the last lio
reports that there are 264,000 -- rifles manufactured each year in the u.s. and of those a 5,443 are exported overseas and 248,000 are used right here in the u.s. a bitter irony that we are confronted with at sandy hook is that the firearm industry's association their headquarters are located just across the highway from the sandy hook elementary school and while focusing on large capacity weapons is important, i also have a bill, hr 66 a. legislation aimed at establishing a nationwide system for prohibiting unlicensed gun ownership and granting the u.s. attorney general broader authority on the program. as sad as the sandy hook incident is for all of us, we must be cognizant of the fact that gun violence has been terrorizing neighborhoods in chicago, detroit, houston, washington washington, d.c. for over decades now. one of my local newspapers, the "chicago tribune," reports that at the end of march, murders in my city had spiked almost 60%. and as of june, homicides in chicago were up almost 20% over last year. 488 murders to date. ranging from 18 months to 19 years. these
according to what is institutionally appropriate. the u.s., there will be a friend of syrian meeting. reports are is that the u.s. is preparing to recognize transitional governments if one were out of this new revolutionary coalition. if there is a transitional government that is recognized, what will the relationship be to these councils that are more ad hoc? are these local? council local do they have to be -- are these local council sustainable? do they have to be accountable for the structures that may emerge? what is the sustainability in the future of these councils? >> they can build their relations. people have to survive. during my stay both in aleppo and italy you see every day, especially if you could to center aleppo, it is bombing. it is a warm toward situation -- war torn situation. different italians were able to unite. one of the first issues was to get them out of the city. it is much more likely that you get bombed. based on they got bombed. -- later on they got bombs. the first challenge is that the city has to be able to defend themselves. how are they going to be
questions from the audience. hosted by the u.s. chamber of commerce this is just under an hour. >> thank you very much. thank you, everyone, for being here this morning. especially those who traveled to be with us. it's nice to close the doors from the rest of washington and the fiscal cliff debate for a little while and talk about fiscal challenges elsewhere. whether it's a good news or bad news, at least it gives us an opportunity to talk about something a little bit different than the news of the day in this final two weeks, i think, before hopefully congress finds an opportunity to either avoid or move or solve some of the fiscal cliff issues and fiscal challenges that we face. and thank you for dick gravich and the work of the panel and the commission he co--led. there are copies of that report that were available when you came in. it's an excellent document that i really encourage everyone to take a close read. it's filled with good analytics in terms of what's going on on the state level. to help us understand. and i fully agree, dick, with your comments earlier about the disconnect.
from a week in brazil. the u.s. would have just grown faster than brazil in the most recent quarter, 2.4%. i raise this because you go down there and talk to business people about why it is. we could have made little more taxes here and a little more regulation there and cost of labor there and a fair amount of uncertainty about what we'll do in the future. they have taken the steam out of it. this is a fragile and requires government to facilitate rather than layer cost and uncertainty on top of it. with that uncertainty and a very aggressive regulatory agenda which has caused uncertainty around health care costs. you add that up and you have a period in which american business is operating under a huge weight. government rates the conditions where businesses and scientists can have the freedom to get the work done. that is an important thing to think about. government can create the conditions under which the cost is listed to allow businesses to innovate. >> if i could follow up. i thought this was amazing. u.s. firms spend 36% to comply with regulation than larger firms. the small
. a cherished leader for the entire house. joe baca is a lifelong public servant, a paratrooper in the u.s. army, look at this, the 101st airborne and the 82nd airborne divisions. he served california state legislature. he made his mark standing firm against harmful and an ty immigrant measures and leading -- anti-immigrant measures and leading on food stamps. it's fraught with meaning. a lot of work and leadership he put into it in the farm bill. joe baca came from humble beginnings, yet his accomplishments are truly significant. the list goes on and on of our colleagues that congresswoman eshoo mentioned. all of these members, public service has been a calling, a cause and a core facet of their character. california has been proud to have them as our representatives in congress. for those of us who served with them, it's an honor for each of us to call you colleagues. for some of us, a very, very special honor to be considered your friend. we all wish you -- we each wish of you much success in the years ahead. we look forward to coming -- continuing our work together on behalf of our great gol
. this will create thousands of u.s. jobs in the hardest-hit industries on jobs that cannot be of course using materials that are 90% made in the usa energy efficiency is unique in that it creates its own cash flow. it pays for itself. there are significant barriers that prevent this from being harvested more efficiency -- more efficiently. one is to begin -- and this is akin to building power plants. we know how to finance power plants. they supply predictable amounts of energy and utility can easily raise capital. however we lack the same capital for energy efficiency even notice understood to be the most cost-effective resource for meeting our needs. the energy efficiency efforts equate to a resource greater than any other source in the country. greater than nuclear, natural gas or coal. this is a great example policy that can move the -- this provides incentive to home owners to increase -- the greater the incentive, i the savings. transitioning allows for business model metrology and creates a system to reward innovation. the good news this the systems will need to make this economically
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7